Home > News > Woman Trafficking – 2 Steps Forward, But We Need A Leap | Laila Dastur Haksar

Woman Trafficking – 2 Steps Forward, But We Need A Leap | Laila Dastur Haksar

woman-in-southern-indiaRecently, there has been a rise in the number of women trafficked from Bangladesh into India’s sex trade.

Together with the Bangladeshi High Commission, the Home Ministry in India is working on a strategy to try to stop this avenue of human trafficking.

But the question still stands, if sent home, would they be safe from this racket again?

Over the past three years, approximately 180 Bangladeshi girls were rescued from brothels in Mumbai, and 80 girls rescued in Delhi. These girls have been placed in rescue shelters accordingly.

A hurdle the government is facing is certifying the girls’ nationalities and trying to repatriate them.  But the question still stands, if sent home, would they be safe from this racket again?

One of largest factors attributing to Bangladeshi women being trafficked into India is the lax border control between the two countries. They share a 4,096 km international border. Five states including West Bengal, Assam, Meghalaya, Tripura and Mizoram share their borders with Bangladesh.

Additionally, these women are destitute, and looking for a way to a better life. According to Subir Roy, a member of a Delhi-based NGO-Shakti Bahini, these women, “Are easily trapped by the traffickers, who lure them on the pretext of giving jobs in India’s metros.”

The Home Ministry is trying many avenues to put an end to the Bangladeshi women trafficking. Firstly, they have sanctioned fencing for over 3,000km of the border. While nearly 77 percent of the work is complete, red tape and disputes over 180 sites on the border of both countries have delayed work.

The Ministry has also issued an advisory to combat trafficking. It states, “The victims and the person actually involved in human trafficking should be treated differently by the police. This is in-line with the SAARC convention which advocates a victim-centric approach.”

Unfortunately, eradicating human trafficking all together is a long way away, as it requires not just solid government programs, but also social and economic change in both countries.

In order to ensure better conviction rates of perpetrators of trafficking, prosecution should be based on documentary, forensic and material evidence.

“State governments are advised to encourage law-enforcement agencies to investigate the cases, so that conviction can be guaranteed. Use of fast-track courts needs to be ensured,” the advisory said.

Hopefully, with the government’s actions to prevent human trafficking, along with the continued effort to rescue, rehabilitate and return those trafficked, human trafficking of Bangladeshi women will soon diminish. Unfortunately, eradicating human trafficking all together is a long way away, as it requires not just solid government programs, but also social and economic change in both countries.

For more information click here:

http://bdnews24.com/bangladesh/2014/08/13/woman-trafficking-to-india-on-the-rise

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